Curriculum Vitae

 

Willem Vogelaar

 

24 july 2003

 

Zoetermeer

 

The Netherlands

 

 

This CV is at: http://www.zeg.news4all.org/cv24/    

 

 

 

Contents:

Overview.. 1

Career Summary. 2

The two customers of CDS for which I have worked: 2

The work done for customer 1 (1993-1995 and 1997-2001) 2

MVER: Multiple versions of a library member 2

Generation of network definitions. 2

LDIS: Library distribution system.. 2

Work done in the Netview environment 2

Making new Netview execs and enhancing existing Netview execs. 3

Menu system running on Netview.. 3

Prototyping with RODM database. 3

My role during my assignment to customer 1. 3

The work done for customer 2 (September 1995- March 1997) 3

Experience with assembler and Data Spaces. 3

My role during my assignment to customer 2. 3

The work done as IBM-er (1970-1993) 4

1970-1975 Developed software for IBM’s customers. 4

1976 Developed software for IBM banking systems. 4

1977-1979 Developed large parts of multitasking DB/DC application. 4

1980-1984 Development work on CALAS. 4

1984-1985 Development work for ECVM... 4

1986-1993 Development work in IBM’s International Network Centre in Zoetermeer 4

Knowledge of Architectures and Major Products. 5

Assembler experience. 5

Other information. 6

Reference. 6

 

Overview

I speak fluent English and Dutch and basic French.

 

Career Summary

 

   

 

 

1993-2001

CDS (Coveford Data Systems Ltd, www.coveford.com), Technical Programmer

 

 

1970-1993

IBM, Netherlands, Development Programmer

 

The two customers of CDS for which I have worked:

 

Customer 1:

From 1993 until May 1995 and from March 1997 until half February 2001 I was assigned to a major Bank in the Netherlands.

 

 

Customer 2:

From September 1995 until March 1997 I was assigned to a Swiss bank.

 

The work done for customer 1 (1993-1995 and 1997-2001)

During all those years I have worked in the Network department. I made a lot of Netview REXX execs and also a lot of REXX code (in combination with ISPF) running under TSO.

The work done during those years can be seen as a ongoing activity, enhancing the software step by step. In the Netview execs a lot of Pipe commands were used. Besides writing software I have also made documents to describe the various functions.

MVER: Multiple versions of a library member

In 1993 I made the software to control multiple versions of a member in a library. This piece of software (let’s call it in this CV: MVER) I have enhanced  during the following years. With standard TSO you can only select members in a library. With MVER you can go one level deeper, seeing all versions available for a given member. In the version list you can also see which member version (and also which backup version) was distributed to the remote MVS systems. In the MVER system you can have an almost unlimited amount of data related to a member version. For example: A history of users who have updated the member version.

Generation of network definitions

Weekly an interface file was delivered to the network department with the definitions of the various components (PU, LU etc.) in the offices of the bank. The network definitions were maintained in another department. Once a week an interface file was created that was send to the Network department. I have made software to do validity checking on the interface file. The interface file was run against a master file to do additional checking. Finally the definitions were placed in members in a library in the format as required by the various Network packages. I wrote also software to create weekly reports in which updates were shown per library and per update number. For each update there was a (short) description.

LDIS: Library distribution system

I have made a system to distribute the network data (parameter files, (NCP) loadmodules etc.) in a controlled way from a central MVS master system to the various remote MVS systems. With MVER all updates made during the week are logged in a change database. At the end of the week the distribution of network data is done based on the information in the change database. At the central MVS master system there is a definition file with information about each remote MVS system and also the names of the libraries on each remote MVS system. On the LDIS panels the weekly distribution is started. That means that a batch job is started in which all necessary FTP requests are generated and passed to FTP to bring the data to the remote MVS systems. Along with the data LDIS commands are sent. Those LDIS commands determine the processing on the remote MVS systems. Finally the results of those jobs running on the remote MVS systems are returned (also via FTP) to the central MVS master system. On the central MVS master system the progress of the distribution can be seen. Also information about error situations occurring on remote MVS systems (e.g. library full, or a ‘not authorized’ situation) is returned to the central MVS master system.

I have also made a DIFF command to compare the contents of libraries as present on the remote MVS systems. The information (ISPF statistics) of the specified  libraries is returned to the MVS master system.

On the MVS master system the results coming from the various remote MVS systems are combined and presented in a nice way.

Work done in the Netview environment

Making new Netview execs and enhancing existing Netview execs

During all those years I have also spent quite a lot of time on making new Netview execs (Rexx) and also enhancing existing Netview execs. I have introduced various scrollable lists. I have made some kind of standard piece of software to allow easy scrolling of data.

Menu system running on Netview

Another function I have made is a menu system for the Netview environment. In a parameter file a hierarchy of functions can de specified which is read by the menu function. The menu function shows the hierarchy in dynamically created panels to the end user. Certain parts of the hierarchy can be shielded for certain users. So the functions shown to network operators can be different from those presented to e.g. helpdesk personnel. With this menu system you can easily rearrange your menu options. Something which would require a lot more time when working in a conventional way, without this menu system.

Prototyping with RODM database

I have also made prototype software that is interacting with a RODM database. I have also made a Netview Rexx exec to make the contents of the RODM database visible in a more elegant way than what was possible with the standard Netview functions.

 

My role during my assignment to customer 1

During all those years I have worked for two project leaders. Most of the time my project leader was also a CDS-er. During another period an employee of the bank was my project leader. Most of the work I had to do was explained on the whiteboard or it was drawn on a few pieces of paper. It was my responsibility to translate those requirements in a technical solution.

 

The work done for customer 2 (September 1995- March 1997)

In 1995 I  was assigned to a Swiss bank. Initially to carry out technical code changes to application systems that were being integrated into a central facility as part of a consolidation project with six other Swiss banks.  Tasks included: removal and automation of console dialogues for the provision of variable input and re-fitting of local modifications to a new version of a major application.  Subsequently charged with the development of major enhancements to a 25 year old, in-house developed database management system, principally to enable multiple copies to run in the same MVS environment.  Converted from CSA usage for cross-address space communication to using Data Spaces; added trace and other diagnostic facilities; developed test drivers in REXX and PL/1 to validate the execution of the new system; prepared and placed all elements under ENDEVOR control and provided comprehensive documentation for the entire system which had never been formally documented.  Additionally, I carried out a feasibility study for the replacement of the system with a simulated  interface to data stored in DB2 databases.  I continued to support and maintain the system on a part-time basis.  After the migration project I developed an ISPF/REXX/PL1 application for the management of microfiche tapes.

Experience with assembler and Data Spaces

During my Swiss assignment I was involved with a BDAM based Data Base system that was written in assembler. When I joined the project, part of the work was already been done. However, a lot of work had still to be done. The BDAM based DB system was  a system with  about 250 assembler routines. About 230 CICS transaction programs were using the DB system and about one thousand batch programs. The main work to be done was to get the DB system to work with Data Spaces instead of CSA (Common Storage Area) storage. Both the DB system itself and the programs using that DB system had to be changed. For the CICS  programs written in assembler I had to change the ASM macro’s to get those programs running with the data in the Data Spaces. Also in the DB system I have made various updates to get the system running in the new way. To be sure that the modified DB system would run correctly I have written a PL/1 program that is doing all (or almost all) DB API calls. The results returned by the API calls were compared with predefined results. Unexpected results were displayed. In that way the errors I introduced in the DB system because of  new modifications were detected quickly.

 

Besides the IBM manuals I used in that time also the books:

·         MVS Power Programming, written by Mitchell Marx and Penelope Davis (ISBN 0-07-040763-0). That book contains excellent information about “Cross Memory Services”.

·         MVS Control Blocks, written by Hank Murphy (ISBN 0-07-044309-2).

 

My role during my assignment to customer 2

During the whole period (almost two years) I had the same project leader. During weekly meetings the tasks where discussed and assigned to one of the available programmers. Besides me there were two other programmers assigned to that migration project. When I joined the project in September 1995 I started learning the system by copying the updates from the production system to the programs of the new system. During the project I got more and more responsibility about the way things had to be done. At the end I was the main person changing the system on behalf of the migration.

 

The work done as IBM-er (1970-1993)

I joined IBM in 1970 and I left IBM at the end of February in 1993.

1970-1975 Developed software for IBM’s customers

During the period 1970 to 1975, I developed software for customers in the Service Bureau Organization. For IBM internal I  ran workshops on PL/1 advanced facilities.     

 

1976 Developed software for IBM banking systems

In 1976 I developed software for IBM banking systems - the 3600 cluster controller and the 3614 cash dispenser. 

 

1977-1979 Developed large parts of multitasking DB/DC application

Between 1977 and 1979, I was responsible for developing large parts of a multitasking DB/DC application running on a VSE 370/135 system which was used for communication with 3730 office systems.  This system was used for an office automation project.

 

1980-1984 Development work on CALAS

Between 1980 and 1984, I carried out development work for a Calendar and Appointment Scheduling system (CALAS) running on VM. This software was written in assembler.

1984-1985 Development work for ECVM

Between 1984 and 1985, I carried out development work for ECVM (European Common VM Systems). Was responsible for the MVS part of DTM (Data Transfer Manager) component of ECVM.  DTM can be used to distribute groups of files, in a controlled manner, between VM and MVS systems.

 

1986-1993 Development work in IBM’s International Network Centre in Zoetermeer

I became “Staff Development Programmer”  in 1986. I  was responsible for the following projects between 1986 and 1993:  

 

 

 

 

 

Knowledge of Architectures and Major Products

 

On IBM mainframes:

 

 

On internet :

 

 

  • REXX

 

 

  • PHP-4 running on Linux

 

  • ISPF

 

 

  • JavaScript and Dynamic HTML

 

  • COBOL

 

 

  • HTML

 

  • PL/1

 

 

  • Java
  • Assembler

 

 

  • Perl

 

  • CA-Endevor

 

 

  • MS Frontpage

 

  • Language Environment

 

 

  • WS FTP Pro

 

  • Netview, RODM

 

 

 

  • VSAM

 

 

 

 

Assembler experience

For about 8 years I was involved with writing and maintaining assembler programs. I learned assembler in 1970 when I joined IBM. The first years of my involvement with assembler was minimal because most software that I wrote was in PL/1. But in the period 1980-1984 I worked at IBM in Uithoorn. There I wrote assembler code for the CALAS application running on VM. CALAS was a Calendar and Appointment Scheduling system. It was a client server application using VMCF to communicate between the client and the server.

 

In the period 1986-1993 I wrote assembler code on behalf of an RSCS security package. It was used to secure the RSCS network by which customers were connected to the IBM Information Network. The assembler code was running in standard RSCS exit points. RSCS (Remote Spooling and Communication Subsystem) is a multitasking system. So programs and exit routines have to be re-entrant.

 

In the period September 1995 – February 1997 when I worked in Switzerland I was involved with a BDAM based Data Base system that was written in assembler. See for more information the description of that assignment period.

 

 

 

Other information

Born

 

 

May 21, 1944 at Dinteloord in The Netherlands

 

Education

 

 

HBS-B, Culemborg 1962 

 

Family situation

 

I am married and I have three children.

 

Private address

 

 

W. H. Vogelaar 

Hildebrandhove  139

2726 AV  Zoetermeer

The Netherlands

 

Telephone

 

 

+31(0)79-3510024

 

     

E-mail

 

 

wh.vogelaar@casema.nl